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Conspiracy Theory Timeline

Conspiracist Episodes in the U.S. 1797-2001

Conspiracism is a particular narrative form of scapegoating that frames the enemy as part of a vast insidious plot against the common good, while it valorizes the scapegoater as a hero for sounding the alarm. Like other forms of scapegoating, conspiracism often, though not always, targets oppressed or stigmatized groups. In many cases, conspiracism uses coded language to mask ethnic or racial bigotry, for example, attacking the Federal Reserve in ways that evoke common stereotypes about "Jewish bankers."

Chip Berlet and Matthew N. Lyons.
RightWing Populism in America: Too Close for Comfort.
New York: Guilford Press, 2000, p. 9.

 

1797–1800 Freemasons/Illuminati ( Europe).

1798–1802 Freemasons/Illuminati ( U.S.).

1820–1844 AntiMasonry (Early Nativism).

1834–1860 Catholic Immigrants (Nativism–Know Nothings).

1830–1866 Slave Power Conspiracy

1873–1905 Plutocrats and Bankers (“The Octopus”).

1903–1920 Jews (Protocols— Russia).

1919–1935 The International Jew (Protocols— Britain & U.S.).

1919–1925 Anarchists and Bolsheviks.

1932–1946 Bankers, Liberal Collectivists, Reds, and Jews.

1940–1950 Reds and the End Times.

1950–1960 Liberal Internationalists & Reds.

1958–1968 Civil Rights Conspiracy..

1963–1970 Assassination Conspiracy Theories.

1960–1980 Sex, Drugs, and Rock & Roll.

1970–1990 Secret Elites.

1975–Secular Humanism: Feminists and Homosexuals

1986–1990 Secret Team.

1990–New World Order.

2001-Post 9-11 Cheney/Bush Neocon Terror Complicity.

2001-Post 9-11 Cheney/Bush Neocon Mossad/Zionists/Jews Terror Complicity.

2001-Post 9-11 Islamic Menace, Cultural Barbarism, “Clash of Civilizations.”

 

 

Conspiracy Theories on the Societal Leval are a Narrative form of Scapegoating

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Democracy is a process,
not a specific set of institutions

Democracy is a process that assumes
the majority of people, over time,
given enough accurate information,
and the ability to participate
in a free and open public debate,
reach constructive decisions
that benefit the whole of society, and
preserve liberty,
protect our freedoms,
extend equality, and
defend democracy.


Democracy is a process,
not a specific set of institutions

Democracy is a process that assumes
the majority of people, over time,
given enough accurate information,
and the ability to participate
in a free and open public debate,
reach constructive decisions
that benefit the whole of society, and
preserve liberty,
protect our freedoms,
extend equality, and
defend democracy.

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Democracy is a process,
not a specific set of institutions

Democracy is a process that assumes
the majority of people, over time,
given enough accurate information,
and the ability to participate
in a free and open public debate,
reach constructive decisions
that benefit the whole of society, and
preserve liberty,
protect our freedoms,
extend equality, and
defend democracy.